SocialNetGate – Social Media Management

SocialNetGate was created to help individuals and businesses manage their social media using their mobile devices. SocialNetGate is built from the ground up as a mobile-first solution that allows users to manage all of their individual and business social media accounts from a single location.

Coffeehouses – Social Networking on 1600s

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Social Networking in the 1600s

People were distracted to social networking even in the 17th Century. The way that we socialize only has changed but the concept remains.

LONDON — SOCIAL networks stand accused of being enemies of productivity. According to one popular (if questionable) infographic circulating online, the use of Facebook, Twitter and other such sites at work costs the American economy $650 billion each year. Our attention spans are atrophying, our test scores declining, all because of these “weapons of mass distraction.”

Yet such worries have arisen before. In England in the late 1600s, very similar concerns were expressed about another new media-sharing environment, the allure of which seemed to be undermining young people’s ability to concentrate on their studies or their work: the coffeehouse. It was the social-networking site of its day.

Read more at   –  Social Networking in the 1600s

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Author: SocialNetGate - Social Media Management

SocialNetGate was created to help individuals and businesses manage their social media using their mobile devices. SocialNetGate is built from the ground up as a mobile-first solution that allows users to manage all of their individual and business social media accounts from a single location.

One thought on “Coffeehouses – Social Networking on 1600s

  1. Social media is a great tool for finding and searching anything. If any one want to connect with the people than the social sites are great way to connect the people. And for business marketing it is also a great platform.

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